Collegiate Students Honored at Elie Wiesel Competition

For 11 years, Norfolk Collegiate’s students have participated in the Elie Wiesel Writing and Visual Arts Competition. The annual, local competition—named after Romanian-born Jewish writer and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel—is open to middle and high school students across Hampton Roads. The event is hosted by the Holocaust Commission of the United Jewish Federation of Tidewater, and students select the category they wish to enter to prepare a project around the topic of the competition.

Students participating in the writing portion of the competition choose one of two prompts to respond to:

“What is it that makes a witness’ or a survivor’s testimony so important to learn? How are these primary sources important to the study of history?”

“Describe a time you discovered information at school or online that caused you to think about your values and how you would represent them. Have you ever unintentionally used social media to hurt others? Have you used it to protect anyone from being maligned by untruths? Describe how you can use social media for social justice in the future.”

The visual arts participants had equally thoughtful themes to think about:

“Utilizing the primary source of survivor and witness testimony on our website, use your chosen medium to show how these true stories of courage have impacted you and the world around you.”

“Create an art form that demonstrates how you have used, or would use, moral courage to stand up for truth and social justice.”

“Through your art entry and based on the three quotations above, express your feelings about Truth in a historical event from your life or from someone you know, and the ill effect of social media on it.”

Multimedia students also had several, interesting choices:

“Utilizing the primary source of survivor and witness testimony on our website, think about how to keep Holocaust history relevant, even as we are losing the eyewitnesses. Use your multimedia entry to show how these true stories of courage have impacted you and the world around you.”

“Remember a time you discovered information at school or online that caused you to think about your values and how you would represent them. Create a multimedia entry that demonstrates how you have used, or would use, moral courage to stand up for truth and social justice.”

“Through your multimedia entry and based on the three quotations above, express your feelings about Truth in a historical event from your life or from someone you know, and the ill effect of social media on it.”

Darby Foster ’23 was a third-place winner in the multimedia category and said she really loved participating in the project.
“I submitted a video about what’s it like to be Jewish in 2019,” said Darby. I talked about how even though there was a lot of hate at the rally in Charlottesville in 2017, there was a lot of love from the local Jewish community, and that’s what we always need to be looking for.”

This year, Collegiate saw several students take top spots and special honors in the junior division portion of the competition. Those students were:

Poetry:
Third Place | Finley McCashin ’24 | View Finley’s entry
Finalists | Sophie Mathas ’23 and Khamarri Boatner ’23

Multimedia:
Third Place | Darcy Foster ’23 | View Darcy’s entry

Visual Arts:
Honorable Mention | Adrianna Bievre ’23 | View Andianna’s entry

Several students were honored by being selected to display their artwork at the annual art show through May 31 at 5000 Corporate Woods Drive, Virginia Beach. Those students were:
Alaijah Kirk-Veal ’23
Sierra Butler ’23
Blair White ’23
Jessa Rousch ’23
Porter Foster ’23

Winners were honored at the Holocaust Remembrance Commemoration—Yom Hashoah—on Wednesday, May 1, at Temple Israel in Norfolk.

15MAY2019