Norfolk Collegiate_Jones Sseaker Series 2020 Image_1920s Revisited

 

The Betty M. & William B. Jones Humanities Speaker Series presents   

The Betty M. and William B. Jones Humanities Speaker Series explores the arts, history and literature through a series of illuminating, engaging sessions that look at societal events and how they impact the human experience. Now in its sixth year, the speaker series has provided unique and intimate sessions that look at societal events and how they impact the human experience.

This year’s series examines how post World War I developments changed attitudes and spurred steps toward equality and civil rights—such as women’s suffrage and the Harlem Renaissance—in the United States.

 

Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020 from 5-7 p.m. | “Jazz...Music for Thought”
Join musician, composer and radio personality Jae Sinnett as he explores the power of jazz in the 1920s. Sinnett will explain how economic, political and technological developments heightened the popularity of jazz in the 1920s to become a genre of music that has since influenced every musical genre and changed the music educational systems we know today.

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Saturday, March 21, from 5-7 p.m. | “A Call to Action: Progressivism and the Promise of Women’s Suffrage”
Join Bonnie Hagerman, assistant professor at the University of Virginia, as she explores the Progressive Era (1890-1920) and the energies it unleashed that spurred a wave of organizing, activism and leadership among women and on behalf of women’s causes. The victories those women secured (the settlement house movement and prohibition), and tragedies they suffered (the Triangle Fire and failure to pass an anti-lynching law), provided valuable experience and insight, and reinforced a commitment to gaining suffrage and the benefits of winning the vote.

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“Revisiting the Harlem Renaissance”
Join Dr. Karima Jeffrey, associate professor, Hampton University as she looks back 100 years on the Harlem Renaissance. A time and date will be updated as soon as it's available.

 

All presentations are free and open to the public and will be held in the Hackney Theater of the Meredith Center for the Arts, 7336 Granby Street. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. A reception will follow each lecture.